New Mysteries on the Library Shelf

I love this time of year!  Lots of new books, by the really good writers!  Here are some of our new ones.

Steve Berry – The Jefferson Key

Political intrigue is served up with style by Steve Berry.  His research is so thorough and so closely intertwined with the plot that it is almost like reading a historical novel.  If you aren’t familiar with Article 1 Section 8 of our Constitution and our country’s historical connection to pirates, you are in for an interesting read that is more action than character driven.

C. J. Box – Free Fire

Janet Evanovich’s Stephanie Plum merely has her vehicle trashed on a regular basis.  Box’s Game Warden, Joe Pickett, goes through vehicles with classy style.  Free Fire takes place in Yellowstone National Park where due to a legal loophole a man gets away with murdering four men.  (The loophole is a true one, which is being closed.)  The Joe Pickett series is a great read, best done from the beginning with Open Season, but if you are already reading the books, you’ll find this one excellent.

J. A. Jance – Betrayal of Trust

Seattle’s Homicide Investigator, J. P. Beaumont, is getting older, in fact one of the suspects calls him ‘an old man’ and his knees hurt.  But he is still one of the best reads in the mystery world.  In this case, the Governor’s step-son is sent a video of a snuff film on his cell phone and the Governor asks for Beaumont to be put on the case.  Jance is an excellent writer. You’ll enjoy this series.

Craig Johnson – Hell is Empty

I need a book of superlative words to write about Craig Johnson and his character, Sheriff Walt Longmire.  Unlike the earlier Longmire books, this is basically a chase, rather than a mystery.  It’s not as funny as some of the earlier books, but there is still a lot of dry wit.  Especially appreciated is the dialogue he ha with himself, explaining to himself how he wound up in such a situation.  The colorful side-characters Johnson has had in the earlier books are here in very small roles.  Hell is Empty is more about Sheriff Longmire himself, and his determination.  (Hell is 13,000 feet up a Wyoming mountain in a freezing, blinding May snowstorm chasing an escaped convict.)

Louise Penny – A Trick of the Light

Another death (!) returns Chief Inspector Gamache to Three Pines, Quebec.  Penny continues to surpass herself with each book.  She is, indeed, one of the most talented of the present day mystery writers. If you haven’t read other books by her, start at the beginning of the series with Still Life, to enjoy the real development of the characters.  You will become addicted to this series.

Anne Perry – Acceptable Loss

The William Monk series takes place in Victorian England.  This book is a continuation of Execution Dock.  Monk is now Head of the Thames River Police.  In this book he is forced to face an evil worse than he has ever faced before. He must, also, once again square off in court against his old friend, Oliver Rathbone.  Rathbone is also faced with the challenge of deciding which loyalty demands the most from him – family, or truth and justice.

Christopher Reich – Rules of Deception

This is a typical non-spy person gets entangled in an international spy drama and must save the world story which requires more suspension of belief than the professional spy type thrillers.  Nevertheless, it is a real page turner.  If you really would like to see Reich’s writing at its best try Numbered Account.

J. D. Robb – New York to Dallas 

This is a bit darker than most Eve Dallas stories.  Eve is a lieutenant in New York’s Homicide Squad in 2060.  The escape of a man she had put behind bars long ago brings her up against a terrible criminal as well as issues from her past, she felt she had dealt with, when the case sends her from New York returning her, once again, to Dallas, Texas.  This book is a major step in the development of Eve Dallas.  It will be interesting to see where she goes from here.

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